Interviews

I was having some difficulties uploading these videos to iMovie, so I’ve uploaded the raw videos instead. Hopefully I’ll be able to get the edited videos out this coming week!

My personal opinion on sexism and cosplay:

I believe that sexism is prevalent in cosplay, and that because the cosplay community is growing larger and more mainstream, the incidents of harassment and misogyny are becoming more common and known to the public.

I believe that most media outlets, especially comic books, objectify and sexualize females without giving them real depth of character or exploring their stories further. I believe that the comic book industry mainly caters to male fantasy without much thought for their female audience.

However, I believe that the world has doomed women to criticism no matter what they look like or what they’re wearing. If a woman is considered unattractive, she is insulted for not being “hot” enough to fill the role. If she is considered attractive, she is called out as a faker and not considered a “true fan”.

I believe that a woman should be able to dress in whatever she wants to dress in, assuming it’s appropriate for the occasion. At a comic convention – why not? She should be proud of the costume and look she worked on, and at least respected in terms of personal boundaries and feedback. She should not have to bear criticism simply because she didn’t buy the best costume or because she’s 150 pounds instead of 110 pounds, too short, too tall, too something or other. She should be able to cosplay as the character she wants, because isn’t that what it’s all about?

Creepshots

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Creepshots And Consent In Cosplay →

Taking pictures of someone’s ass, specifically, rather than of their whole costume from the front, is a sexual act. The fact that folks are doing so furtively, attempting to avoid an interaction that might lead to their being denied permission for their actions, suggests that they’re pretty aware they’re doing so without consent. And if you know you’re sneaking around, and also want to be a decent person, that should probably make you think… Cosplay is not a permission slip. There isn’t a lower level of scrutiny for people who take furtive shots of a woman’s behind at a convention or while she’s at school. A creepshot is still a creepshot, no matter where it’s taken and what a woman is wearing.

Rosenberg, Alyssa. "Creepshots And Consent In Cosplay." ThinkProgress. Center for American Progress Action Fund, 30 Oct. 2012. Web. 19 Feb. 2013. <http://thinkprogress.org/alyssa/2012/10/30/1108631/creepshots-cosplay/>.

Interview with Touhou Cosplayers

My Vimeo account is back up and running! Here’s the next interview with two Touhou cosplayers (Yuuka and Yukari) I met at Animation on Display.

I’m still not sure who the blonde cosplayer is cosplaying, so if you know, please enlighten me in the comments!

Found out the correct name and have updated the post.

Cosplay Ain’t Comics – But Neither is Misogyny

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Cosplay Ain’t Comics – But Neither is Misogyny →

See, that’s kind of the root of it all, isn’t it? The belief that as a geek guy, you’re entitled to the affections of an attractive woman in cosplay. The belief that you will be rewarded with the geek-girl of your dreams, that she’s just going to drop into your lap even if you don’t really make an effort to treat her like a human being. No matter how rude you are to a woman, or no matter how much you can’t move past thinking of her as an object in a costume that you can have sex with, that you are entitled and deserve her attention and affections.

And when she doesn’t give it to you because you’re not her type, or she already has a boyfriend, or she’s not interested, or because you just plain old don’t deserve it because you are rude and horrible? Then she’s obviously not really a geek girl, because geek girl’s are designed by god to have sex with and cater to you. All based on one mutual interest.

Cosplayers aren’t comics, no, but neither is misogyny. Cosplay breaths life into already brilliant work, lifting it off the pages and letting everyone have just a tiny slice of reality to go with their fiction. Misogyny closes ranks, excludes community members makes you look like an asshole. It does nothing.

Cosplay is appreciation and celebration. Misogyny and judging women like produce based on their ‘geek cred’ or legitimacy is hatred. Learn the difference.

Commander. "Cosplay Ain’t Comics — But Neither is Misogyny." Cosplaynaut. Cosplaynaut, 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 13 Feb. 2013. <http://www.cosplaynaut.com/2012/11/cosplay-aint-comics-but-neither-is-misogyny/>.

Sexualized Comic Book Heroines

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It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s super hero sexism →

In an effort to reverse slumping sales figures and attract the attention of a new generation of readers to their brands, DC Comics re-launched all of its comic book series earlier this year – some 52 separate titles in total. The “New 52” features Catwoman having sex with Batman on the roof of a building and a super heroine named Starfire (appearing in Red Hood and the Outlaws #1) “drawn like a centerfold from the swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated [who] has become a promiscuous amnesiac.” The research appears in an article by Casey Brienza, a doctoral student in sociology at the University of Cambridge and one of the most well-known manga experts in the U.S. (Her ongoing project is a sociological account of the rise of manga in the United States and its implications for the globalization of culture.)

DC Comics produces comics featuring many well-known characters, including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman and the Green Lantern. Brienza says most superhero comics talk about women, not to them, and asks why U.S. superhero comics are so masculine. After all, Brienza points out, “other comic book-loving countries such as Japan and France do not manifest the same trends, and the self-same superhero characters, when presented in another medium-such as Hollywood film- have truly mass appeal.”

She finds that “American superhero comics, and the sexual objectification of their heroines, reflect the conditions of their production and consumption: they are made almost exclusively by and for men.” By way of example, Brienza cites research that the number of men versus women credited in the production of the new DC (and competitor Marvel) superhero comics is extremely unbalanced; on average women account for less than 10 percent of the production staff and are concentrated in less prestigious roles.

Comic book heroines are being objectified and sexualized, reflected perhaps best in their costumes. Maybe we’d have less incidents of attractive cosplayers being harassed if their character’s costumes were less revealing? Or should a woman be able to wear whatever she wants without backlash?

I personally believe two things – firstly, that woman *are* written about inappropriately in comics and other media, and secondly, that regardless, women should be able to wear what they like without fear of inappropriate behavior or other negative attention.

"It's a bird, it's a plane, it's super hero sexism." NewsRx Health 8 Jan. 2012: 7. Nursing and Allied Health Collection. Web. 13 Feb. 2013.

The “Fake Geek Girl” Has Got to Go

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The “Fake Geek Girl” Has Got to Go →

You demean women who cosplay as attention seekers in skimpy outfits, ignoring that they didn’t create those outfits, WE did … At the core of it all, for some insane reason, you are so threatened by the presence of women in your interests that you insult, you cajole, you harrass, and you embarrass the rest of us who are just happy to share. You slam women who are attractive and cosplay as NOT REAL NERDS, THEY’RE PREYING ON US POOR WIDDLE MENZ! And when they’re not as attractive as you’d like, you slam them for not meeting your standards. Or you slam them for daring not to give you the time of day when you grope and harass and hit on them. And if you look like me while doing it, that’s even more hilariously hypocritical and out of touch with reality. She’s not there for YOU, bro.

Powell, Jesse. "The 'Fake Geek Girl' Has Got to Go." Jesse Accidentally a Whole War on Time and Space. N.p., 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 13 Feb. 2013. <http://randomredux.tumblr.com/post/35698623762/the-fake-geek-girl-has-got-to-go>.